Undergraduate Course Descriptions

Newman Theological College courses are offered on a rotation. This means that not all courses outlined below are offered in each semester of each year. For further details see the specific course offerings for the current academic year. These Course Offerings Sheets are also available for pickup in the foyer of Student Services on campus.

The B.Th. program is not designed to be taken as a Distance Education program.

Distance education courses at Newman Theological College are held to the same academic standards as on-campus courses.

Every distance education course shall be assessed through the same means as on-campus courses, including an opportunity for students to evaluate the course. All distance education courses include regular opportunities for substantive interaction between professors and learners and among learners. There are opportunities for interaction with the professor at least weekly as part of the course. Additionally, instructors make themselves available to distance education students for individual discussions on an as needed basis via Skype, telephone, etc. In some cases individual tutorials of this nature may be part of the course requirements. When these are mandatory it will be indicated on the course syllabus.

Up to date information on the skills and requirements for Distance Education at Newman Theological College is maintained on the College website under Programs & Courses.

Foundational Theology

Core Courses

FND 110G Introduction to Catholic Studies I*

3 Credits
An historical introduction to Catholicism from its roots in Jewish and Greco-Roman antiquity to modern times. Catholicism’s key literary, religious, and institutional contributions to Western culture will be studied through the close reading and discussion of representative Great Books of the Catholic Tradition.


FND 111G Introduction to Catholic Studies II*

3 Credits
An historical introduction to Catholicism from its roots in Jewish and Greco-Roman antiquity to modern times. Catholicism’s key literary, religious, and institutional contributions to Western culture will be studied through the close reading and discussion of representative Great Books of the Catholic Tradition. Successful completion of FND 110G* is a prerequisite for FND 111G*.


FND 120 Exploring the Catechism of the Catholic Church

3 Credits
This course presents an introduction to Catholic belief and practice by means of a study of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students will thoroughly consider each of the Catechism’s four parts: on Faith, on Liturgy, on Life in Christ, and on Prayer. Select texts from Church fathers and doctors as well as other magisterial and conciliar documents may be drawn upon to illuminate the Catechism’s own systematic presentation.


FND 130G Way of Beauty: Sacred Fine Arts I*

3 Credits
An introduction to the theory and practice of sacred fine arts. Classroom seminars on aesthetics and art history will introduce students to the West’s rich tradition of architecture, painting and music alongside seminal reflections on beauty by such as Plato, Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas, John Ruskin, Jacques Maritain, Josef Pieper, and Joseph Ratzinger. The practical element of this course will normally include participation in a sacred music choir as well as short workshops on Eastern Iconography and other sacred arts.


FND 131G Way of Beauty: Sacred Fine Arts II*

3 Credits
An introduction to the theory and practice of sacred fine arts. Classroom seminars on aesthetics and art history will introduce students to the West’s rich tradition of architecture, painting and music alongside seminal reflections on beauty by such as Plato, Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas, John Ruskin, Jacques Maritain, Josef Pieper, and Joseph Ratzinger. The practical element of this course will normally include participation in a sacred music choir as well as short workshops on Eastern Iconography and other sacred arts. Successful completion of FND 130G* is a prerequisite for FND 131G*.


FND 150 Writing and the Art of Rhetoric

3 Credits
A study of the fundamentals of clear and eloquent expression. Practical exercises in English grammar and syntax will be enriched by the recitation and consideration of classical and modern examples of persuasive writing in such authors as Cicero, St. Paul, St. Augustine as well as Jane Austin, Abraham Lincoln, GK Chesterton, and Flannery O’Connor.


FND 211 Early Church History

3 Credits
The historical development of the Church from the second century to the rise of Islam. The relationship of Church and Empire, the beginnings of monasticism, the contributions of women, the development of institutions and doctrine, and the missionary activity of Christians beyond the Greco-Roman World.


FND 216 The Church in Canada

3 Credits
The history of Christian presence in Canada from the beginnings in New France to the modern era, with a particular but not exclusive focus on the Roman Catholic experience. The foundations of the Church in Canada, the Church and indigenous people, the Church in Western Canada, the formation of a Canadian theology. Students are urged to have some familiarity with Canadian history in preparation for this course.


FND 221  Medieval Church History

3 Credits
The historical development of the Church in the Medieval Era from the beginning of the eighth century to 1500. Monasticism and religious orders, heretical movements and popular religion, intellectual development, Church and State relations.


FND 230 Christianity and World Religions

3 Credits
Founders of religions and the meaning of religion. Christianity in relation to other religions. An introduction to Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese Religions, and Amerindian Religions. New religious movements. Interfaith dialogue, especially between Christians and Jews.


FND 231  Modern Church History

3 Credits
The church from the end of the fifteenth century until today. Calls for reform. Key reformers: Luther, Zwingli, Calvin, Cramner. Catholic reforms and the Council of Trent. The Enlightenment and its aftermath: liberalism, anti-clericalism, ultra-montanism and Vatican I. Byzantine churches. Missionary movements and North American Protestantism. The church as global: Latin America, Asia, Africa. Modernism, ecumenism, Vatican II and toward the 21st century.


FND 240 Christianity and Literature

3 Credits
A study of some of the great works of Christian literature that have profoundly shaped thinking on human life, and particularly on philosophical and theological questions. This course looks at central themes such as sin, conversion, love, fidelity and friendship through analyzing the works of major Christian writers. Authors such as Hildegard von Bingen, Dante, Chaucer, Erasmus, Milton, Donne, Herbert, Austin, Hopkins, Chesterton, Sayers, Waugh, Eliot, Lewis, Tolkien, Goudge, Hill and others may be explored.


FND 250 Anglican Tradition

3 Credits
Anglicanism from the 16th century to the present with a view to identifying theological direction and emphasis which have been characteristic of this community. The role played by formularies, representative writers and liturgy in the formation of Anglican self-understanding will be examined. Anglicanism and the ecumenical movement


FND 310G Patristic Theology*

3 Credits

A historical and literary overview of Christian writers and theology from the first to the seventh century. Select fathers in the eastern and western Church, the development of Trinitarian and Christological doctrine, and the emergent western theological tradition will be considered.


Elective Courses

FND 207 Eastern Christianity

3 Credits
An introduction to the Eastern Christian Churches. Theological, historical and institutional developments. Major themes: the Divine darkness, the Trinitarian God, creation and cosmology, economy of salvation, image and likeness, the Taboric light, deification, spiritual and moral life, ecclesiology, sacramental practice, ecumenical mission. The dialogue among Eastern Catholics, Roman Catholics and the various jurisdictions of the Orthodox world.


FND 321 Medieval Theology

3 Credits
The development of Christian doctrine and of the discipline of theology, as seen in the major themes and thinkers of the Christian Middle Ages, will be examined in lectures and through the reading of primary and secondary sources.


FND 350 Protestant Theology

3 Credits
The main theological currents arising in contemporary Protestantism. The distinctive features of Protestant theology in various countries. The thought of select Protestant theologians. Liberalism, Fundamentalism, Ecumenism, Feminist Theology, Liberation Theology.


FND 360 Theology & Culture

3 Credits
The role of theology in contemporary culture. Reflections on approaches and methodology. The contribution of the sciences, the social sciences, philosophy, the arts, and literature to the study of theology.


FND 390 Selected Topics

3 Credits
Varied Course Descriptions.

Sacred Scriptures

Core Courses

SCR 100 Introduction to Sacred Scriptures and their Interpretation

3 Credits
This course introduces students to the Sacred Scriptures of the Christian faith, their academic study and their interpretation.  The various books of the Old and New Testaments of the Catholic Bible are introduced in relation to their historical, cultural, and religious backgrounds, with timely references to geographical and archaeological data.  Concurrently, students are introduced to the concepts of biblical inspiration, biblical inerrancy, and the formation of the canon.

This course also includes a seminar that explores the question of the interpretation of scripture with the Mind of the Church, during which key Church documents will be analyzed while some major contributions from the world of academia to the field of biblical interpretation will be considered.  The aim is to equip students with a range of exegetical tools and building blocks that will be necessary in subsequent scripture courses in their chosen program, and indeed in their various ministries as exegetes of Sacred Scripture.


SCR 253 The Pentateuch and Historical Books

(Prerequisite: SCR 100)

3 Credits
This course considers the Canonical corpus of the Old Testament traditionally referred to as the Pentateuch (the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy) and their cognate literature known as the Historical Books (Joshua, Judges, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings, 1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra and Nehemiah). The literature is investigated as a distinct body and in relation to the Canon of Scripture, with particular emphasis given to historical, literary (including text critical), exegetical and theological questions. The relationship between the Israelites and God—as portrayed by the biblical authors of the Pentateuch and Historical Books —is explored through the theme of covenantal love.

The seminar component of this course will invite students to engage, at a level pertinent to their program of study, with contemporary issues raised by the literature at hand.


SCR 254 The Prophets

(Prerequisite: SCR 100)

3 Credits
This course considers the Canonical corpus of the Old Testament traditionally referred to as the Prophets.  The literature is investigated as a distinct body and in relation to the Canon of Scripture, with particular emphasis given to historical (pre-exilic), literary (including text critical), exegetical and theological questions.  The relationship between the Israelites and God—as portrayed by the biblical prophets—is explored from the perspective of messianism and ‘new covenant theology’.

The seminar component of this course will invite students to engage, at a level pertinent to their program of study, with contemporary issues raised by the literature at hand.


SCR 260 The Synoptic Gospels

(Prerequisite: SCR 100)

3 Credits
This course focuses on the Canonical Gospels of the Synoptic tradition.  The Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke are introduced, with particular attention given to their structure, their specific characteristics and historical circumstances, as well as their presentations of Jesus Christ and their teachings on Christian discipleship. This course also includes a seminar, during which students will investigate, at a level pertinent to their program of study, questions arising from a consideration of the interrelationship between the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke.


SCR 261 Matthew and Mark

(Prerequisite: SCR 100)

3 credits
This course considers the Canonical Gospels of Matthew and Mark. Initial considerations of the historical backdrops to these gospels lead to a closer examination of the literature. Both gospels are read in their entirety, with particular attention given to their Christology, Pneumatology, Discipleship, Ecclesiology,
Missiology, Eschatology, and overall theological perspectives within and in relation to the Canon of Scripture.

The seminar component of this course invites students to investigate, at a level pertinent to their program of study, questions arising from a consideration of the interrelationship between the two gospels.


SCR 351 Psalms and Wisdom Literature

(Prerequisite: SCR 100)

3 Credits
This course considers the Canonical corpus of the Old Testament traditionally referred to as the Psalms and Wisdom literature (Psalms, Job, Proverbs, Qoheleth/Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs, Wisdom of Solomon and Sirach/Ecclesiasticus).  The Psalter and Wisdom Literature are covered in turn, with specific emphasis given to historical, literary, exegetical and theological questions.  In particular, the themes of faith and hope, human condition and suffering, and perceived absence of God, in selected texts form the Psalter and the book of Qoheleth/Ecclesiastes are examined for their contribution to pastoral ethical contemporary issues.

The seminar component of this course will invite students to engage, at a level pertinent to their program of study, with contemporary issues raised by the literature at hand.


SCR 355 Pauline Literature

(Prerequisite: SCR 100)

3 Credits
This course considers the epistolary literature of the New Testament attributed to the Apostle Paul.  A brief survey of the Apostle’s life and gospel gives way to a close reading of the Pauline Letters.  Although all Pauline Epistles will be read (1 Thessalonians, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, and Romans), students will in particular consider central Pauline themes (Christology, Ecclesiology, Soteriology, Pneumatology) as expounded in the First Letter to the Corinthians and the Letter to the Romans. 

The seminar component of this course will invite students to engage, at a level pertinent to their program of study, with contemporary issues raised by the literature at hand.


SCR 362 Luke-Acts

(Prerequisite: SCR 100)

3 credits
This course considers the Canonical compositions attributed to St. Luke: the Gospel and the Book of the Acts of the Apostles. An initial consideration of the historical backdrops to these literary compositions leads to a close sequential examination of the Gospel and the Book of Acts. Both works are read in their entirety, with particular attention given to their Christology, Pneumatology, Ecclesiology, Missiology, Eschatology, and overall theological perspectives within and in relation to Salvation History.

The seminar component of this course invites students to investigate, at a level pertinent to their program of study, historical and theological questions arising from a consideration of the Lukan material.


SCR 366 Johannine Literature

(Prerequisite: SCR 100)

3 Credits
This course considers the Canonical literature traditionally attributed to the Fourth Evangelist (Gospel of John; 1, 2 and 3 John, the Book of Revelation).  An initial consideration of the milieu from which the Johannine Community/School emanated (date, authorship, and provenance) serves as a backdrop to a closer examination of the literature.  The entirety of the Johannine corpus will be read, with particular attention given to the distinctive Christology (Signs, “I AM” Sayings), Pneumatology (the Spirit-Paraclete), Ecclesiology, Missiology, Eschatology, and overall theology of this Canonical body of literature.

The seminar component of this course will invite students to engage, at a level pertinent to their program of study, with contemporary issues raised by the literature at hand.


Elective Courses

SCR 110 The Old Testament

3 Credits
Formation and interpretation of the Old Testament: biblical inspiration, canonicity, textual criticism, hermeneutics, history, geography and archaeology. Understanding the Old Testament. Study of selected texts from the Pentateuch, Historical Books, Psalms, Wisdom, Prophets, and Deutero-Canonical books of the Old Testament focusing on salvation history and covenant theology.


SCR 115 The New Testament

3 Credits
Formation and interpretation of the New Testament: biblical inspiration, canonicity, textual criticism, hermeneutics, history, geography and archaeology. Understanding the New Testament. Study of selected texts from the Gospels, Pauline Letters, Catholic Epistles and other NT writings (Acts of the Apostles, Hebrews, etc.).


SCR 226 The Book of Acts and Other New Testament Writings

(Prerequisite: SCR 100)

3 Credits
This course considers the Book of the Acts of the Apostles and the epistolary literature constituted of the Letter to the Hebrews, 1 and 2 Peter, James, and Jude. Central Theological themes (Christology, Ecclesiology, Pneumatology, Soteriology) are identified and expounded.

The Seminar component of this course invites students to engage, at a level pertaining to their particular program of study, with contemporary issues raised by the literature.


SCR 356 The Bible and Women

(Prerequisite: SCR 100)

3 Credits
Study of the biblical texts which focus on women: the narratives about women's lives, the feminine metaphors for God and the people of God, and the ideals presented for women's lives. Introduction to feminist methods of biblical interpretation.


SCR 360 The World of the New Testament

(Prerequisite: SCR 100)

3 Credits
History of the New Testament era. Context of Judaism, 63 BCE-66CE. Common Judaism: daily life and worship. Groups and parties. Zoroastrianism. Jewish and Hellenistic thought and literature: Apocrypha, apocalyptic, testament, rabbinical literature. The Septuagint. Philo. Greco-Roman religions. Stoicism. Gnosticism.


SCR 390 Selected Topics

3 Credits
Varied course descriptions.

Systematic Theology

Core Courses

SYT 100 Introduction to Theology

3 Credits
The nature of theology. The relationship between theology and the following: revelation (Scripture and Tradition), spirituality and liturgy, philosophy and the human sciences. Faith and reason. The high points of theology throughout the history of the Church.  The importance of theology for the Church. Theology and the teaching office of the Church. Theology and Church before and after Vatican II.  Writing skills in theology.


SYT 184 Christology

3 Credits
The contemporary problematic in Christology. The claims and challenges posed by Jesus in his preaching and life. His rejection, death and resurrection. Jesus Christ as divine and human. Traditional and contemporary Christologies.


SYT 214  Introduction to the Sacraments and Christian Initiation

(Prerequisite: SYT 100)

3 Credits
The sacraments of initiation. Their biblical roots and their historical and theological development in the Christian Church. Contemporary revisions, pastoral applications and ecumenical consideration.


SYT 215 Liturgical Theology

(Prerequisite: SYT 100)

3 Credits
The biblical origins of the Christian Liturgy.  The development of distinct rites in the Eastern and Western Church with a special attention to the ongoing development of the Roman Rite. The theology of Liturgy as a work of the Trinity, an Action of Christ and the Church. The sanctification of the Year and the Day through the celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours. The liturgical movement prior to and following the Second Vatican Council. Cultural, pastoral, and ecumenical considerations.


SYT 240 Theological Anthropology

(Prerequisite: SYT 100)

3 Credits
The Christian understanding of evolution and of the human person. The origin, the structure and the condition of the person in the world; the relationship of the person to God, to others and to the environment. Sin and the origin of evil. The role of grace and love. The relationship between infinite and finite freedom. Hope and the final end of the person.


SYT 288  Ecclesiology

(Prerequisite: SYT 100)

3 Credits
The Church before and after Vatican II. The vision of the Church underlying the basic biblical images (People of God, Body of Christ, Temple of the Holy Spirit). The Church as constituted by the Word of God. The Church as constituted by the Word made flesh. The Church and holiness (including Mariology). The Church as one and apostolic. The Church and the world.


SYT 308 The Theology of Revelation

(Prerequisite: SYT 100)

3 Credits
The modern problem of the compatibility between an authoritative divine revelation and human knowledge, freedom and experience. The development of a “theology of revelation” from Vatican I to Vatican II. Revelation and the Enlightenment. Dei Verbum. Jesus Christ as the revelation of God and humanity. Pluralism and the unity and universality of the Christ event. The Church's teaching on revelation and faith. The Christian act of faith. The question of truth and of on-going revelation.


SYT 385 Theology of God

(Prerequisite: SYT 100)

3 Credits
Aspects of the problem of God in the modern era. Preparations for belief in the Trinity in the history of Israel. The Christ event and the Trinity. The Trinity and the early Church Councils. “Explanations” of the Trinity old and new. Special questions regarding the Trinity (the Trinity and the immutability of God, creation, modern science, evil, gender, Christian worship and spirituality). Pneumatology.


Elective Courses

SYT 200 Understanding Catholicism

(Prerequisite: SYT 100)

3 Credits
Topics in the understanding of the Roman Catholic faith.


SYT 212  Reconciliation and the Pastoral Care of the Sick and Dying

(Prerequisite: SYT 100)

3 Credits
Sin and conversion, sickness and healing in Scripture. The historical and doctrinal development of these sacraments within the Christian tradition. The liturgical celebration of these sacraments and the Order of Christian Funerals, together with pastoral and ecumenical considerations.


SYT 250 The Resurrection of Jesus Christ

(Prerequisites: SYT 100)

3 Credits
The background to the resurrection in the Hebrew Scriptures and Intertestamental literature. The preaching of the resurrection-exaltation in the New Testament. The tomb appearance narratives. The relationship between the cross-resurrection and Trinity, the Church and Mary. The credibility of the resurrection.


SYT 290 God and Humanity in Film

(Prerequisites: SYT 100)

3 Credits
An analysis and discussion of various North American and European films. The relationship between God and the human person, love and hate, good and evil, truth and falsehood, beauty and sin. A study of how film reflects or does not reflect the values of western society and/or the Church.


SYT 343 The Holy Eucharist

(Prerequisites: SYT 100 and SYT 214)

3 Credits
A historical, scriptural, theological and liturgical study of the Eucharist, examining the development of the Church’s understanding of this Sacrament and its relation to the Pascal Mystery through five main periods: New Testament, Patristic, Scholastic, Modern and Contemporary. It reviews the emergence of the Eastern and Western rites, with special attention to the Roman Rite, examining the structure of the Eucharistic prayer and its theological underpinnings.


SYT 355 Contemporary Issues in Christology and Theology of God

(Prerequisites: SYT 100)

3 Credits
The Christologies of some of the major theologians: Barth, Bultmann, Pannenberg, Moltmann, Schillebeeckx, liberation theologians, Rahner, von Balthasar. Specific issues in relation to God: atheism, secularization, gender in God, the suffering of God.


SYT 357 Ecumenism

(Prerequisites: SYT 100)

3 Credits
History of the ecumenical movement. Ecumenical dialogue between the Roman Catholic and the Eastern, Anglican and Protestant Churches. Ecumenical activities and dialogues in Canada. Models of Christian unity. Liturgical convergence. Christian-Jewish relations.


SYT 360 Key Theologians: Hans Urs Von Balthasar

(Prerequisites: SYT 100)

3 Credits
Central themes in his theology and spirituality.  Influences on his thought.


SYT 361 Key Theologians: Karl Rahner

(Prerequisites: SYT 100)

3 Credits
Central themes in his theology and spirituality.  Influences on his thought.


SYT 390 Selected Topics

(Prerequisites: SYT 100)
3 Credits
Varied course description.

Moral, Pastoral, Spiritual Theology

Core Courses

MPS 100 Introduction to Pastoral Theology

3 Credits
Biblical and historical roots of pastoral theology; theological foundations; current understanding; initial exploration of a theology of ministry and the study of specific ministries; introduction to theological reflection; formation for ministry.


MPS 120 Introduction to Moral Theology

3 Credits
The basic elements of moral theology since Vatican II. Biblical and theological themes that define the person in Christ. The Christian meaning of sin, virtue, conscience, law and moral discernment. The Christian experience of conversion and reconciliation in the way of discipleship.


MPS 170 Introduction to Spiritual Theology

3 Credits
Definitions and understandings of spirituality. Examination of its biblical foundations. Development of spirituality as a discipline of theology. Theological and anthropological dimensions of Christian faith and spirituality. Introduction to the classical spiritual writers, schools of spirituality and contemporary forms of spirituality. The theology and practice of prayer, spiritual discernment and asceticism.


MPS 222 The Social Teaching of the Church

3 Credits
The roots of social justice in the tradition. Major themes in the social teaching documents of the Church. Social teaching in the Canadian/North American church. Social justice, ministry and evangelization. Liberation theology. Social analysis as a tool for Christian ministry.


MPS 230 Theology of Ministry

3 Credits
Origins of Christian community and relationship with the mission of the Church. The meaning and development of ordained ministry as well as history of lay ministry and the relationship between the two. Current issues and ecumenical initiatives. Contemporary models of collaboration in ministry.


MPS 339 Theological Field Education

6 Credits
An introductory practicum consisting of a ministry placement under individual supervision, related classes, and theological reflection in groups on the experience gained. Students must meet with the Director of Field Education at the beginning of their 2nd academic year on the B.Th. program in order to schedule for an assessment and ministry placement.

Students have three options:

  • MPS 339ab – To do a year-long ministry placement with a concurrent theological reflection session during the 3rd academic year.
  • To complete a Clinical Pastoral Education(C.P.E.) unit during the summer followed by a Theological Reflection Seminar (MPS 339b) in the Fall semester of the 3rd academic year. Copy of the C.P.E. certificate must be provided to the Director of Field Education and Registrar in order to receive transfer credit for MPS 339a which accounts for the practicum component of Field Education.
  • MPS 339P – A student enrolled in the one year pastoral placement of MPS 339P is considered in full-time enrollment at NTC. To take a full pastoral internship year at the parish with supervision followed by a Theological Reflection Seminar (MPS 339b) in the following fall semester. This option is available to seminary students. Students register for MPS 339P for the fall of internship year and then MPS 339b in the following fall.

Registration for all three options of MPS 339 requires formal approval by the Field Education Director. MPS 339 Theological Field Education, when offered with a yearlong ministry program or a summer Clinical Pastoral Education unit, is not fulfilled if the student does not pass the ministry portion of the program (MPS 339a) or vice versa (if the student passes the ministerial program but does not pass the Theological Reflection MPS 339b). Under exceptional circumstances, a student may be allowed to repeat MPS 339ab upon the recommendation of the Field Education Director.


Elective Courses

MPS 229 Married Love and Sexuality in the Christian Tradition

(Recommended: SYT 240)

3 Credits
The human dimensions of love and sexuality. The religious meaning of human sexuality in the Judeo-Christian tradition, with special reference to Christian marriage. Issues raised by the contemporary sexual revolution. Doctrinal, liturgical, moral, pastoral, sacramental and spiritual dimensions of Christian marriage.


MPS 233 Practice of Ministry

3 Credits
The basic responsibilities, skills and attitudes of ministry today, particularly in the parish context. These include: understanding the parish reality today and its pastoring; working with Parish Councils and Finance Committees; sacramental preparation; collaborative ministry and team building; conflict resolution; spirituality for today's ministry; pastoral approaches to today’s youth; self-care for ministers; and some other practical issues for today’s effective ministry in parishes.


MPS 235 Introduction to Church Law

3 Credits
Role of law in the Church today. The development of Canon Law. Ecclesiastical laws and the people of God. Revision of Church Law.


MPS 236 Ministry Among the Suffering

3 Credits
The theory and practice of ministry among various groups of suffering people (e.g. the sick, the dying, the handicapped, those with addictions, victims of violence, and the homeless). There will be an emphasis on learning methods and techniques of caring. This will be achieved by means of case studies, role playing, and personal reflection.


MPS 240 Christian Religious Education

3 Credits
In CHRISTIAN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, participants explore the religious and faith development of children, youth and adults with attention to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the General Directory for Catechesis and current catechetical programs. An introduction to teaching skills with emphasis on sacramental preparation, youth ministry and adult religious learning is presented and discussed.

In DIRECTIONS IN ABORIGINAL MINISTRY, participants of the Aboriginal Conference are invited to develop a strong theology of interculturation of faith and to explore a variety of subjects that are directly related to ministry, spirituality, forgiveness, and reconciliation. The course includes presentations and discussions on aboriginal ministry, spirituality and issues, successes, challenges and major issues facing the Aboriginal people of Canada today.


MPS 274 The Concept of Christian Faith

3 Credits
This course begins with a consideration of a prevailing view of Christian Faith as separate from and opposed to human reason, the difficulties with this view and its historical background. The course then examines a variety of views of Christian faith found in Sacred Scripture and Christian tradition, along with 19th and 20th century philosophical and theological works that influence the notion of faith, and works toward a view that incorporates the important insights of each.


MPS 281 Theology and Practice of Preaching

3 Credits
Theology of the Word of God. Theological and pastoral principles of preaching. A practicum for preaching.


MPS 283 Preaching in the Anglican Tradition

3 Credits
Theology of the Word of God. Theological and pastoral principles of preaching. A practicum for preaching.


MPS 325  Bioethics: Moral Issues from the Life Sciences

(Prerequisite: MPS 120 Recommended: SYT 240)

3 Credits
Basic human and Christian values at stake. The rapid development in medical technologies and the growing complexity of the moral issues involved. From extensive case studies, an attempt to develop adequate models for moral evaluation and pastoral counselling.


MPS 342 Classic Christian Spiritualities

(Prerequisite: MPS 170)

3 Credits
Definition of Spirituality and its relationship to Theology. Examination of the biblical foundations including the Jewish context and the connection to the Greek contemplative ideal. Early period to include Origen, the Desert Tradition, early monasticism, Gregory of Nyssa, Evagrius Pontius, and Pseudo Dionysius. The spiritualities of the Middle Ages including Bernard of Clairvaux, the Franciscans, Meister Eckhart, and Julian of Norwich. The course will culminate in spiritualities of St. Ignatius (Ignatian), St. John of the Cross and St. Teresa of Avila (Carmelite).


MPS 366 Marriage: Canonical Issues

(Prerequisite: MPS 235)

3 Credits
The place and importance of matrimonial legislation in Church law. General principles, Laws governing preliminaries to marriage, impediments, consent, canonical form, time and place of marriage, effects. Convalidation. Separation of spouses. Second marriages. Pastoral care of the divorced and remarried.


MPS 370 Contemporary Spiritualities

(Recommended: MPS 170)
3 Credits
Fundamental notions of contemporary spirituality and faith. Biblical roots of Christian spirituality. Dimensions of an holistic spirituality. Contemporary spiritual figures and recent spiritual movements. Dimensions of contemporary spiritualities, both Christian and non-Christian. The spirituality of major contemporary theologians. The contributions of the pure and social sciences to spirituality. Prayer, conversion and discipleship.


MPS 375 Spiritual Direction

(A preliminary interview with the instructor is required for admission to the course)

3 Credits
The course deals with the meaning, foundations and principles of spiritual direction in the Church’s tradition. It examines the Biblical foundations and historical development of spiritual direction and its relation to a person’s growth in faith, in prayer and in the Christian life. It will explore some practical aspects of the ministry of spiritual direction and look at the qualities required for those called to this ministry.


MPS 380 The Practice of Christian Ritual

(Prerequisite: SYT 214 or SYT 215)
3 Credits
Theological and pastoral principles for presiding within the liturgical assembly. A practicum for presiding at sacramental liturgies and other cities.


MPS 382 Ritual in the Anglican Tradition

3 Credits
Theological and pastoral principles for presiding within the liturgical assembly. A practicum for presiding at sacramental liturgies.


MPS 384 Theology and Spirituality of Icons

3 Credits
This course will explore the background to the Eastern Christian doctrine concerning icons, including the iconoclast controversy, the patristic writings in defense of icons, and the 7th Ecumenical Council. We will examine the symbolism and meaning of many of the most well-known icons in their details and investigate how icons are made use of liturgically and in our spirituality. The course will also explore the actual process of painting icons with a professional iconographer.


MPS 386 Introduction to Pastoral Counselling

3 Credits
An introduction of the basic issues involved in the ministry of pastoral counselling. Emphasis on heightening the students' understanding of theory, skills, personal maturity and related ethical issues.


MPS 390 Selected Topics

3 Credits
Varied course description.